Colorizer Plugin

If you do any work in HTML and CSS, you’ve probably spent your fair share of time coding color values; however, a value like “#432958” doesn’t really help you know exactly what color that value represents. Wouldn’t it be nice if the text editor could let you quickly visualize these color values?

TKE’s CSS Colorizer plugin to the rescue. If you are editing an HTML or CSS file, the Colorizer plugin will parse for all valid CSS-styled color syntax and set the background color of the syntax to the color that it represents.

 

To install the plugin, select the Plugin / Install… menu option and then select the “CSS Colorizer” from the resulting plugin list. Once the plugin has been installed, you can colorize any HTML/CSS/SCSS file by selecting the Plugins / CSS Colorizer / Colorize menu option. This will immediately colorize all of the color syntax within the current file.

Once you have selected the colorize menu option once for a file, any subsequent saves of that file will automatically re-colorize the file. You can also re-select the colorize menu option at any time to re-parse the file.

The following color syntax is supported:

  • #RRGGBB
  • #RGB
  • rgb( red, green, blue )
  • rgba( red, green, blue, alpha )
  • hsl( hue, saturation%, luminosity% )
  • hsla( hue, saturation%, luminosity%, alpha )

To see more information and download your copy of the TKE code editor, visit http://tke.sourceforge.net.

Colorizer Plugin

Vim Macro Recording

A quick tip for Vim mode users…

TKE has support for Vim’s macro recording feature when Vim mode is enabled. Vim macros are basically just a recording of some number of keystrokes that the user used while recording is enabled. These recorded macros can then be “played” at any time which will essentially replay the keystrokes within Vim, allowing you to do a lot of repetitive tasks quite quickly within the editor.

There is support for automatic recording (that is, you can repeat the last Vim command at any time just by pressing the ‘.’ key). You can also repeat the last Vim command-line (started by entering ‘:’ when in COMMAND mode), by entering the ‘@’ key followed by the ‘:’ key.

There is also support for recording to multiple macro “registers”. Each register is named by a single letter of the alphabet (i.e., a-z, A-Z as well as the doublequote (“) character). To begin recording keystrokes to a named register, simply enter ‘q’ (when in COMMAND mode) followed by the name of the register to use and then begin entering the keystrokes that you would like to store in the macro register. When you are done entering keystrokes, enter ‘q’ when in COMMAND mode. While you are recording, the information bar at the bottom of the main window will display the recording status and the name of the macro register being recorded into.

Main Window Status Bar Indicating Recording Status

 

To playback the recorded keystrokes of a register, enter ‘@’ when in COMMAND mode, followed by the name of the register to playback. The keystrokes will be played back immediately.

So if you are Vim user, you probably already know this, but here is the TKE tip for this week….

Vim macros are recordable and usable in any editing buffer within TKE. That means that you could record a macro in one editing buffer and replay that macro in another editing buffer. So if you find yourself performing the same types of tasks in multiple files, do the task once in one buffer and replay the macro in all of the other files. (Insert mind blowing explosion sounds here).

Sweet.

To see more information and download your copy of the TKE code editor, visit http://tke.sourceforge.net.

Vim Macro Recording

Vim Mode

The Vim editor is exceptional in many, many ways, and it has been a staple of many programmers and writers primarily due to its keyboard focused approach to editing and its extensibility and flexibility. Vim is a fantastic editor to use within a terminal because it does not necessitate a graphical user interface and works fairly well when you are spending most of your time within that terminal.

Vim was designed and written at a time when graphical user interfaces were not as mainstream as they are today. I’ll never forget the first few times I attempted to use Vi to edit a file in college. A blank screen with just a cursor staring at me with no instructions for use and, try as I may, typing on the keyboard did practically nothing. I needed to track down someone with knowledge of the editor just to do basic things, and then I needed to commit those first few keystrokes to memory. It’s no wonder that I initially sought out the few graphical editors that were available to me at the time instead of sticking with it. Though Vim’s keyboard-centric editing features, once committed to memory, are incredibly efficient, there are elements of having a graphical user interface that improves on Vim. Ease of learning, discoverability of features, better view modes, and interactions with those features are just some of those improvements.

The marriage of the Vim editing experience and a graphical user interface has been attempted by many editors in the past but many of those editors fall short, relegating Vim mode to a second-class citizen — a plugin of sorts — instead of integrating it into the core experience. There was also many things about gvim (a graphical implementation of a Vim editor) that didn’t seem to work quite right to me.

This is one of the primary reasons TKE was created, to attempt to create a modern editor which integrates deeply with Vim editing functionality. Most editing features added to TKE are implemented for Vim mode first or designed with Vim editing in mind, making sure that Vim editing remains frictionless and central to the TKE editing experience.

If you consider yourself in the Vim camp and are looking for a great graphical Vim editor, give the TKE editor a try. It is hoped that you will find a terrific editing experience with additional superpowers.

To see more information and download your copy of the TKE code editor, visit http://tke.sourceforge.net.

Vim Mode

Markdown Table Beautifier Plugin

In TKE 3.2 a new plugin called the “Markdown Table Beautifier” is included which, when run, cleans up any table syntax found inside of a Markdown document. This essentially involves, making all table columns be vertically aligned and all cell contents be justified according to their column justification indicators. It also will adjust all rows to include the maximum column specified within a table row. All of this cleanup helps make Markdown tables easier to read in Markdown format.

Essentially the Markdown Table Beautifier plugin can run on all tables found within a single Markdown file or it can run only on the table where the insertion cursor is within.

To install the plugin, select the Plugins / Install… menu option, find the Markdown Table Beautifier plugin in the resulting list, highlight it and hit the RETURN key. Once the plugin has been successfully installed, you can run it by simply selecting the Plugins / Markdown Table Beautifier submenu and choosing one of the two available options to beautify all tables or only the currently selected table. Note that these menu options will only be enabled if the file syntax is either Markdown or MultiMarkdown.

Clean and easy to read tables without the fuss? Check and check.

To see more information and download your copy of the TKE code editor, visit http://tke.sourceforge.net.

Markdown Table Beautifier Plugin